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FIGHT FOR WILDLIFE

Australian Wildlife Sanctuary is dedicated to Fight for Wildlife. For many species, our dedication is their only hope of survival.

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The Australian Wildlife Sanctuary believe it is our duty as occupiers of the world to protect and conserve our unique wildlife.

 

Conservation is the end goal of our organisation, and with Australia being a country so rich in wildlife diversity it is devastating that more than 1800 species of animals and plants are listed at risk of extinction.

 

The Australian Wildlife Sanctuary have identified several species of fauna and  flora that we are fighting for to secure their future.

These species and more make up our Fight for Wildlife program.

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Long-nosed Potoroo

Scientific Name: Potorous tridactylus

Conservation Status: Commonwealth Vulnerable/NSW Vulnerable

Population trend: Decreasing

Threats: Habitat loss and fragmentation from land clearing for residential and agricultural development. Predation from introduced animals including foxes, wild dogs and cats

What is our plan:

  1. Establish numerous colonies at the sanctuary and participate in recovery and reintroduction efforts

  2. Partner with and support the conservation efforts of other institutions that are working to conserve the Long-nosed Potoroo

  3. Continue to educate and gain awareness for this threatened species through education programs and any other means to spread information about the species.

What can you do to help:

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Brush-tailed Rock Wallaby

Scientific Name: Petrogale penicillata

Conservation Status: Commonwealth Vulnerable/NSW Endangered

Population trend: Decreasing

Threats: Habitat loss and fragmentation from land clearing for residential and agricultural development. Infestation by invasive weeds causing loss and degradation of foraging habitat. Predation from introduced animals including foxes and wild dogs

What is our plan:

  1. Support the efforts of the Friends of the Brush-tailed Rock Wallaby organisation in their efforts in protecting wild Shoalhaven populations

  2. Maintain a colony at the sanctuary and participate in recovery and reintroduction efforts

  3. Partner with and support the conservation efforts of other institutions that are working to conserve the Brush-tailed Rock Wallaby

  4. Continue to educate and gain awareness for this threatened species through education programs and any other means to spread information about the species.

What can you do to help:

Brush-tailed Bettong (Woylie)

Scientific Name: Bettongia penicillata

Conservation Status: Commonwealth Endangered/IUCN Critically Endangered

Population trend: Decreasing

Threats: The decline of the Brush-tailed Bettong appears to have been caused by a number of factors, including the impact of introduced grazing animals, land clearance for agriculture, predation by introduced red foxes, cats and wild dogs and possibly changed fire regimes.

What is our plan:

  1. Maintain numerous colonies at the sanctuary and participate in recovery and reintroduction efforts

  2. Partner with and support the conservation efforts of other institutions that are working to conserve the Brush-tailed Bettong

  3. Continue to educate and gain awareness for this threatened species through education programs and any other means to spread information about the species.

What can you do to help:

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Bush-stone Curlew

Scientific Name: Burhinus grallarius

Conservation Status: NSW Endangered

Population trend: Decreasing - 10,000 left in the wild

Threats: The decline of the Bush-stone Curlew appears to have been caused by a number of factors, including the modification and destruction of ground habitat through removal of litter and fallen timber, introduction of exotic pasture grasses, grazing and frequent fires disturbance in the vicinity of nest sites. trampling of eggs by cattle and predation by foxes, cats and wild dogs.

What is our plan:

  1. Maintain pairs at the sanctuary and participate in recovery and reintroduction efforts

  2. Partner with and support the conservation efforts of other institutions that are working to conserve the Bush-stone Curlew in NSW

  3. Continue to educate and gain awareness for this threatened species through education programs and any other means to spread information about the species.

What can you do to help:

  • leave fallen timber on the ground; this provides camouflage for the bird as well as areas for foraging

  • conserve patches of trees on your property, and allow some natural regeneration for the future; large patches and small clumps of trees suit the bush stone-curlew more than long, thin corridors of vegetation

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Parma Wallaby

Scientific Name: Macropus parma

Conservation Status: NSW Vulnerable/IUCN Near Threatened

Population trend: Decreasing

Threats: Predation by foxes, cats and wild dogs. Loss and fragmentation of habitat through clearing and under scrubbing. Heightened risks associated with bush fire. Agricultural and destruction of under storey and shrub layer by grazing stock. Grazing competition by horses, cattle, pigs and rabbits.

What is our plan:

  1. Maintain colonies at the sanctuary and participate in recovery and reintroduction efforts

  2. Partner with and support the conservation efforts of other institutions that are working to conserve the Parma Wallaby in NSW

  3. Continue to educate and gain awareness for this threatened species through education programs and any other means to spread information about the species.

What can you do to help:

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Southern Hairy-nosed Wombat

Scientific Name: Lasiorhinus latifrons

Conservation Status: NSW Endangered/IUCN Near Threatened

Population trend: Decreasing

Threats: The small population size, isolation, and proximity to agricultural areas and roads makes this species vulnerable to rapid local declines. Grazing by rabbits and domestic stock reduces food. Pasture composition is critical to recruitment, potentially causing high infant mortality if degraded.

What is our plan:

  1. Maintain a pair at the sanctuary and participate in recovery and reintroduction efforts

  2. Partner with and support the conservation efforts of other institutions that are working to conserve the Southern Hairy-nosed Wombat in NSW

  3. Continue to educate and gain awareness for this threatened species through education programs and any other means to spread information about the species.

  4. Participate and contribute to any research or recovery programs of the species.

What can you do to help:

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Rufous Bettong

Scientific Name: Lasiorhinus latifrons

Conservation Status: NSW Endangered/IUCN Near Threatened

Population trend: Decreasing

Threats: The small population size, isolation, and proximity to agricultural areas and roads makes this species vulnerable to rapid local declines. Grazing by rabbits and domestic stock reduces food. Pasture composition is critical to recruitment, potentially causing high infant mortality if degraded.

What is our plan:

  1. Maintain a breeding pair at the sanctuary and participate in recovery and reintroduction efforts

  2. Partner with and support the conservation efforts of other institutions that are working to conserve the Southern Hairy-nosed Wombat in NSW

  3. Continue to educate and gain awareness for this threatened species through education programs and any other means to spread information about the species.

  4. Participate and contribute to any research or recovery programs of the species.

What can you do to help:

  • Facebook
  • Instagram
  • TikTok
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